Activities and crafts

8 ways to display kids artwork

Finding ways to display kids artwork is a constant struggle. Especially at this time of the year when they bring home all the amazing pictures they’ve created in school and playschool over the past ten months.

So do you hang them on the fridge? Leave them lying on the kitchen counter for weeks on end? Try to smuggle them into the bin?

“Mum! Why is my picture of me on a rocket ship in the recycling bucket??”

Oops.

So to keep you out of trouble, and the kids all happy, we’ve compiled a list of some awesome ideas to help you organise all those little masterpieces.

Ways to display kids artwork

1. Repurpose old wooden hangers

Create an ever changing personalised art gallery using a simple wooden hanger like this one.

ways to display kids artwork

2.  Repaint old picture frames

Aren’t these lovely? Use up all those old frames by painting in pretty colours and attaching some wire clips with miniature pegs (often available in Tiger stores).

ways to display kids artwork

via Woohome

3. Create a poster

A brilliant way to save a heap of pictures at once. These are great for hanging in your child’s room too.

ways to display kids artwork

4. Stairwell gallery

Display their creations for everyone to see. Simply use a variety of similar frames (hello Ikea), and hang them all up the stairs. (Bonus tip – they’re also great for covering up sticky handprints!)

ways to display kids artwork

via House of Turquoise

5. Use clipboards

So simple, so effective. We’re off to the stationary store immediately!

ways to display kids artwork

via A Beautiful Mess

6. Bulletin boards

This has to be one of our favourites. Use your own creativity to make it as pretty as possible. Bunting, fairy lights and wall art sticks would all work well.

ways to display kids artwork

via The creativity exchange

7. Print it to canvas

Pick out your absolute favourite and create a canvas print that will stand the test of time. Did someone say Pablo Picasso?

ways to display kids artwork

Via Artful Parent

8. Make a book

Make up a book of all your children’s creations. Small books can be created each year and popped in the bookcase, labelled by year. These also make lovely gifts.

ways to display kids artwork

Of course you could just save all these ideas to Pinterest, make your plan, have all the good intentions in the world… and then stick them on the fridge until you’ve forgotten all about it. It’s ok.  No judgement here. We’ll probably do the same.

More you might like

Beginners guide to gardening with kids
Toddler play ideas
Kids craft – Tree top birds

ASK JESSICA

Q. I’m would like to start an exercise programme that will benefit my emotional health as much as my physical health, but I don’t know which type of class would be best. Should I consider choosing from yoga, pilates, tai chi, or could you recommend a class, please?

A It’s great that you have decided to get into exercise. The benefits to you are going to be great. You’ll sleep better, have more energy, better skin, reduced stressed, not to mention all the amazing physical benefits of your clothes fitting better, and looking healthy, trim and toned! My advice to you would be to try them all. Even if some don’t offer pay-as-you-go sessions, if you get in touch directly with the instructor, they will almost always let you try it out first to see if it’s for you. All of the above things that you mentioned are great for mental health, so it really will be a personal preference as to which you go for. On top of the classes you mention, all forms of exercise will give you great mental rewards so consider the not so obvious interval training sessions, bootcamp, and circuits too, as you will also feel on top of the world after a class like that.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE
MUST READ

ASK LUCY

Q My son is 18 months old and has just started saying his first words. It is an extremely exciting time in our house and my husband and I are eager to encourage his speaking as much possible. What advice would you give us on how we can foster this without bombarding and confusing him?

AThere is nothing better than hearing your baby begin to talk. All the hard work you have put in over the last two years is coming back tenfold.
Toddlers will vary significantly with ability and speed of which they talk however a guide would be about 50 words by 2 years of age. The most important thing to watch for is that your baby/toddler is cooing and babbling and begins to string sounds together like “Mama/Dada” They should have a wide range of speech sounds and like to imitate you and things they hear.
There are many ways that you can promote Speech and Language development at home:
1. Slowing down your own speech and taking time over conversations with your little one. Every day is a new experience when you are 18 months, nappy changes, bath time, baking a cake brings endless opportunity for you to interact and offer new words for them to hear and repeat. Make eye contact, smile and use exaggerated tones to keep things interesting and fun for your tot.
2. Review the toys that you have on offer to your tot and ensure that they give plenty of open ended play opportunities. Role play is a wonderful way to allow children to take the lead. Kitchens with lots of plates, cups and pots. Fill the pots with dry pasta and allow your child to cook and serve you. Playdoh, painting, gardening and sandpits are also great for allowing your child to take the lead and babble about what they are doing. Read plenty of books together and point and allow them time to answer any questions that you ask.
3. Limit screen time. Overuse of televisions and iPads do not give your child opportunity to interact in a two way manner.
4. Ask your child lots of open ended questions “What’s that?” “Where are we?” Point at things they know the answer to for boosting confidence (Car/ Car, etc.) When they don’t know the answer, explain it to them. Limit baby talk and speak clearly with good pronunciation, remember you are the teacher and they will copy you.
If you are concerned about your child’s speech and language development, be sure to speak with your GP or developmental Health Nurse. They are very skilled at understanding the difference between speech delays and spotting something that may require professional attention.
Enjoy watching their little brains absorb the world around them and listen to what they have to say. It won’t be too long before they won’t stop talking to you, asking “Why Mummy/ Daddy?” every 5 minutes….