tips on decorating your baby's nursery
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9 expert tips on decorating your baby’s nursery

Award-winning interior designer Moya Farrell gives her top tips on decorating your baby’s nursery.

Although pregnancy can come with its ups and downs, decorating a nursery is most definitely one of the high points when preparing for a new arrival.

I love working with parents-to-be and seeing the excitement build, as we create a snug space where they and their baby can cherish precious early days together. Although a variety of colour schemes will work for a nursery design, I particularly like starting with a neutral base and adding accent colours through accessories and fabrics throughout the space. Grey is an excellent neutral base to start with, because it compliments traditional nursery colours like blue or pink.

If you’re an expectant parent then nursery decorating is quite possibly something you have thought about. Whether you’re a first time mum or dad or already have children, decorating a nursery and organising a space for your new arrival should be a really exciting and enjoyable process. The following are a few ideas for creating the perfect nursery for your newborn.

Moya’s tips on decorating your baby’s nursery:

1. Ceiling colour

In a bright room, painting the ceiling evokes a lovely, cosy feeling in the space, so consider painting the ceiling as oppose to the walls. You could also add some simple ceiling stars using wall decals for both a tasteful and tranquil setting.

2. Snug seating

It’s really important to create a cosy space for you and your baby to bond in during those night time feeds. Optimise comfort with soft furnishings and textiles, such as rugs, throws and cushions as well as something like an ottoman that you can put your feet up on.

3. Changing area gallery

Changing areas should first and foremost be functional and have ample storage for nappies and all the lotions and potions you will need. But why not make it a little decorative with some cute artwork, teeny tiny mirrors and even a hanger with your baby’s first outfit – such a lovely way to hold onto sentimental pieces when they’ve grown out of them!

4. A blanket ladder

This is a really simple but clever way of storing blankets and towels where they will be both decorative and practical – being at easy reach and saving the need for rummaging through drawers.

5. Storage

Because babies come with lots and lots of stuff, storage is key. There are so many ways to make their clothes storage look adorable, and because baby clothes are so cute, they don’t need to all be hidden away. Although some closed off storage is definitely advisable, an exposed baby wardrobe is a very cute feature for the nursery too.

6. Cool cots & cradles

Cots and cradles are a great place to invest, particularly because they can be passed on to siblings or to friends and family. Spending time researching to find a style that you like or if you’re lucky enough to know someone in the furniture making business getting something bespoke made is a particularly lovely idea.

7. Sweet shelving

Shelving doesn’t have to be boring and can be such a nice way of displaying baby gifts and keepsakes. Keep it sweet and simple for maximum impact of all those sentimental items and cute gifts.

8. Laundry love

With several outfits a day, not to mention piles of towels and dribble bibs, your laundry basket is going to become your new best friend, so my advice would be to invest in one that you love!

9. Less is more

It may be the ultimate design cliché but it’s completely spot on when it comes to nursery design. All of these ideas are lovely but the bottom line when it comes to nursery decorating is to aim for functional simplicity. With the rate infants grow out of things, there’ll be a lot of packing away, storing and de-cluttering, so make sure you have ample storage options and lots of space to keep things in an organized fashion. But ultimately from a design perspective keep things simple but beautiful. This space is a tranquil place, of rest and relaxation for you and your baby.

Everything in the room needs to promote this type of environment. So for example opt for soft, subtle colours rather than loud vibrant ones to ensure a calming effect in the room. And remember this is an exciting time and decorating your new nursery should be one of the most exciting things ahead of your baby’s arrival. Enjoy the process and don’t stress if things aren’t perfect straight away, it will all come together in the end.

About Moya – Moya is award-winning interior designer and blogger. Her design blog designology.ie is the perfect online destination for all the interiors inspiration and advice you need. 

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ASK LUCY

Q My son is 18 months old and has just started saying his first words. It is an extremely exciting time in our house and my husband and I are eager to encourage his speaking as much possible. What advice would you give us on how we can foster this without bombarding and confusing him?

AThere is nothing better than hearing your baby begin to talk. All the hard work you have put in over the last two years is coming back tenfold.
Toddlers will vary significantly with ability and speed of which they talk however a guide would be about 50 words by 2 years of age. The most important thing to watch for is that your baby/toddler is cooing and babbling and begins to string sounds together like “Mama/Dada” They should have a wide range of speech sounds and like to imitate you and things they hear.
There are many ways that you can promote Speech and Language development at home:
1. Slowing down your own speech and taking time over conversations with your little one. Every day is a new experience when you are 18 months, nappy changes, bath time, baking a cake brings endless opportunity for you to interact and offer new words for them to hear and repeat. Make eye contact, smile and use exaggerated tones to keep things interesting and fun for your tot.
2. Review the toys that you have on offer to your tot and ensure that they give plenty of open ended play opportunities. Role play is a wonderful way to allow children to take the lead. Kitchens with lots of plates, cups and pots. Fill the pots with dry pasta and allow your child to cook and serve you. Playdoh, painting, gardening and sandpits are also great for allowing your child to take the lead and babble about what they are doing. Read plenty of books together and point and allow them time to answer any questions that you ask.
3. Limit screen time. Overuse of televisions and iPads do not give your child opportunity to interact in a two way manner.
4. Ask your child lots of open ended questions “What’s that?” “Where are we?” Point at things they know the answer to for boosting confidence (Car/ Car, etc.) When they don’t know the answer, explain it to them. Limit baby talk and speak clearly with good pronunciation, remember you are the teacher and they will copy you.
If you are concerned about your child’s speech and language development, be sure to speak with your GP or developmental Health Nurse. They are very skilled at understanding the difference between speech delays and spotting something that may require professional attention.
Enjoy watching their little brains absorb the world around them and listen to what they have to say. It won’t be too long before they won’t stop talking to you, asking “Why Mummy/ Daddy?” every 5 minutes….

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ASK LOUISE

Q My son is 18 months old and has just started saying his first words. It is an extremely exciting time in our house and my husband and I are eager to encourage his speaking as much possible. What advice would you give us on how we can foster this without bombarding and confusing him?

AThere is nothing better than hearing your baby begin to talk. All the hard work you have put in over the last two years is coming back tenfold.
Toddlers will vary significantly with ability and speed of which they talk however a guide would be about 50 words by 2 years of age. The most important thing to watch for is that your baby/toddler is cooing and babbling and begins to string sounds together like “Mama/Dada” They should have a wide range of speech sounds and like to imitate you and things they hear.
There are many ways that you can promote Speech and Language development at home:
1. Slowing down your own speech and taking time over conversations with your little one. Every day is a new experience when you are 18 months, nappy changes, bath time, baking a cake brings endless opportunity for you to interact and offer new words for them to hear and repeat. Make eye contact, smile and use exaggerated tones to keep things interesting and fun for your tot.
2. Review the toys that you have on offer to your tot and ensure that they give plenty of open ended play opportunities. Role play is a wonderful way to allow children to take the lead. Kitchens with lots of plates, cups and pots. Fill the pots with dry pasta and allow your child to cook and serve you. Playdoh, painting, gardening and sandpits are also great for allowing your child to take the lead and babble about what they are doing. Read plenty of books together and point and allow them time to answer any questions that you ask.
3. Limit screen time. Overuse of televisions and iPads do not give your child opportunity to interact in a two way manner.
4. Ask your child lots of open ended questions “What’s that?” “Where are we?” Point at things they know the answer to for boosting confidence (Car/ Car, etc.) When they don’t know the answer, explain it to them. Limit baby talk and speak clearly with good pronunciation, remember you are the teacher and they will copy you.
If you are concerned about your child’s speech and language development, be sure to speak with your GP or developmental Health Nurse. They are very skilled at understanding the difference between speech delays and spotting something that may require professional attention.
Enjoy watching their little brains absorb the world around them and listen to what they have to say. It won’t be too long before they won’t stop talking to you, asking “Why Mummy/ Daddy?” every 5 minutes….